Objects old, vintage, hand made or upcyled, and old techniques with a modern twist

Winter Knitting

Every autumn when the weather gets colder I start knitting again, and produce at least one pair of socks a year. Having hunted for properly warm socks for years previously I have decided that hand knitted is definitely the way to go- they can be as thick or as thin as you like, and you can use the softest, warmest wool you can find.

knitted-socks

There are also some great colour ways and self-patterning sock yarns available these days, so it’s easy to make quite complicated pattern using just one ball of yarn.

hand-made-socks

Christmas is Coming!

I don’t feel at all Christmassy until at least November, but have decided that it is definitely time to start thinking about making Christmas cards!

I am planning to use up materials that I already have (sample shown here), including some lovely creamy-coloured old music sheets. I just have to decide on the layout now…

handmade-christmas-cards

Vintage Knitting

VINTAGE-KNITTING

I came bought this humorous cartoon at a car boot sale earlier in the year. It dates from the  beginning of the First World War (1914), but anyone who has struggled with a knitting pattern will recognise the sometimes strange results that stem from ambitious intentions!

VINTAGE-KNITTING-CARTOON

“That looks easy enough…”

KNITTING-CARTOON

“I’m sure tension doesn’t really matter…”

WARTIME-KNITTING-CARTOON

“Well, I suppose that it’s the thought that counts!”

PUNCH-KNITTING-CARTOON

“I can honestly say that I did wear them…”

Monday Mood Board: Dahlias

SALMON-PINK-DAHLIAS

The Dahlias are still looking gorgeous; I love the gradation of hues, and the structural pattern formed by the petals.

 

I haven’t made a friendship bracelet since I was at school, but decided to experiment with the method as I have plenty of embroidery thread in lovely colours.

As you can see, I experimented with a few different colour combinations and patterns. The free-form pattern below I made up as I went along, experimenting with changing direction.

I wanted to use the finished piece as something other than a bracelet, so decided to make a short length to use as a zipper pull on a jumper.

As I had cut longer strands of thread than I required for the pull, I left a gap and then knotted a second section below the first to use in another project.

KNOTTED-BRACELET

I trimmed the ends and cut the top section free from the bottom section.

CHEVRON-PATTERN

The top section became the zipper pull, with the loop used to thread it through the metal ring on the zipper.

This was a good way to use up some of the odds and ends of thread that I had in my stash: now I have to decide on projects for the other pieces that I made…:-)

MULTICOLOURED-BRACELETS

If you fancy having a go for yourself (and didn’t learn how to make these as a child) then there are plenty of helpful guides and how-to videos to be found online.

Some more lovely vintage and antique embroideries, this time in neutral white and creams. I featured coloured embroideries a few weeks ago, but felt that these understated lovelies deserved their own post! Some are destined to be sold as they are, and some will be upcycled.

Tassel Garland

This is a quick DIY project, ideal as a decoration for summer parties. It is also a great stash-busting project as small pieces of leftover yarn from other projects can be used.

MATERIALS:

Darning/tapestry needle

Yarn in various colours

Scissors

YARN-RAINBOW

First choose your colours. The tassels can be made in any size of your choice, for this garland I made 10 the same size, and one larger one for the centre of the garland. In order for the tassels to be the same length the yarn can be measured out by wrapping it around a piece of cardboard, or another flat object. The thickness of the tassel is dependent on how many strands it contains (therefore how many times it is wrapped around the card).

YARN-TASSEL-DIY

Tie the bunch of yarn together in the centre, and fold in half.

Next, using the tail of yarn from tying the tassel together, wrap yarn tightly around the top quarter/third of the tassel and tie off. Cut the tails of your tassel to make them even and to open up the closed loops.

Finally thread a large-eyed darning or tapestry needle with your stringing material (yarn, ribbon, cord etc), and pass it through each of the tassels. The top of the tassels should have been wound tightly enough that they remain where you place them on the string.

COLOURED-TASSELS

Et voila, one finished garland to be hung where you desire!

YARN-TASSELS

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